30 July 1889 – a Tuesday

bathed in the sun’s light
is your canvas. It arrived. —
the chestnuts blossom 1

© rl busséll 2019 – All rights reserved


Background image: Blossoming Almond Tree by Vincent van Gogh, Oil on Canvas, Saint-Rémy, France: February, 1890, Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

From 16 July to 21 August 1889 there is no correspondence from Vincent Van Gogh.


  1. The Undergrowth with the trees surrounded with ivy, the Lane in Arles (Avenue of Chestnut Trees in Blossom) and the Fields with the gardens in springtime are really beautiful, these, and some others too, are now mounted on stretching frames from which we removed those that were on them and are currently at Tanguy’s Letter 793

29 July 1889 – a Monday

it is hard to write
your painting is marvelous —
that cough’s killing me 1

© rl busséll 2019 – All rights reserved


Background image: Blossoming Almond Tree by Vincent van Gogh, Oil on Canvas, Saint-Rémy, France: February, 1890, Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

From 16 July to 21 August 1889 there is no correspondence from Vincent Van Gogh.

  1. As for me, I look like a corpse, but I’ve been to see Rivet, who gave me all kinds of drugs, which are good, though, in that they’ve stopped that cough that was killing me. I think it has gone now. Letter 793

28 July 1889 – a Sunday

So hope you’re well.
You know you’re always welcome —
think of our small room 1

© rl busséll 2019 – All rights reserved


Background image: Blossoming Almond Tree by Vincent van Gogh, Oil on Canvas, Saint-Rémy, France: February, 1890, Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

From 16 July to 21 August 1889 there is no correspondence from Vincent Van Gogh.

  1. Should you ever think that it might do you good to be among people who would like to do their best to cheer you up a little, and who would like to have you with them, then think of our little room. Letter 794

27 July 1889 – a Saturday

The day gave birth to
what Rod’s eyes saw: wooden huts —
light barely escapes 1

© rl busséll 2019 – All rights reserved


Background image: Blossoming Almond Tree by Vincent van Gogh, Oil on Canvas, Saint-Rémy, France: February, 1890, Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

From 16 July to 21 August 1889 there is no correspondence from Vincent Van Gogh.

  1. Whilst not liking Rod’s book excessively, I’ve nevertheless done a canvas of that passage in which he speaks of the darkish mountains and huts. Letter 787

26 July 1889 – a Friday

this latest crises
came upon me in the field —
ochre yellow pain 1

© rl busséll 2019 – All rights reserved


Background image: Blossoming Almond Tree by Vincent van Gogh, Oil on Canvas, Saint-Rémy, France: February, 1890, Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

From 16 July to 21 August 1889 there is no correspondence from Vincent Van Gogh.

  1. And it was precisely a more sober attempt, matt in colour without looking impressive, broken greens, reds and rusty ochre yellows, as I told you that from time to time I felt a desire to begin again with a palette like the one in the north. Letter 797

25 July 1889 – a Thursday

I’m distraught, frantic.
The world’s the heaviest stone —
Push. Push. Push. Push. Push. 1

© rl busséll 2019 – All rights reserved


Background image: Blossoming Almond Tree by Vincent van Gogh, Oil on Canvas, Saint-Rémy, France: February, 1890, Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

From 16 July to 21 August 1889 there is no correspondence from Vincent Van Gogh.

  1. For many days I’ve been absolutely distraught, as in Arles, just as much if not worse, and it’s to be presumed that these crises will recur in the future, it is ABOMINABLE. Letter 797

24 July 1889 – a Wednesday

still I need canvas filled;
they mock me by being bare —
can’t breathe without brush 1

© rl busséll 2019 – All rights reserved


Background image: Blossoming Almond Tree by Vincent van Gogh, Oil on Canvas, Saint-Rémy, France: February, 1890, Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

From 16 July to 21 August 1889 there is no correspondence from Vincent Van Gogh.

  1. You’ll perhaps do well to write a line to Dr Peyron to say that working on my paintings is quite necessary to me for my recovery.Letter 797

23 July 1889 – a Tuesday

they won’t let me paint
they are afraid I’ll lose myself —
swallow turpentine 1

© rl busséll 2019 – All rights reserved


Background image: Blossoming Almond Tree by Vincent van Gogh, Oil on Canvas, Saint-Rémy, France: February, 1890, Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

From 16 July to 21 August 1889 there is no correspondence from Vincent Van Gogh.

  1. Van Gogh not only ate filthy things he picked up from the ground but also tried to poison himself by eating paint and drinking turpentine, as emerges from the ‘monthly notes’ recorded by Dr Peyron in the admissions register of Saint-Rémy. (See Le grand registre de l’asile de Saint-Rémy in Documentation, 8 May 1889.) This was probably why he was not allowed to go to his studio. Letter 797